[OKC BOMBING] MORRIS DEES STUNNED AT DISCOVERY OF FBI MEMO
J.D. Cash
[OKC BOMBING] MORRIS DEES STUNNED AT DISCOVERY OF FBI MEMO
Mon Feb 2 14:11:04 2004
64.140.158.5

MORRIS DEES STUNNED AT DISCOVERY OF FBI MEMO
http://www.mccurtain.com/deespart1.htm

Morris Dees, a co-founder of the Southern Poverty Law Center who is a legend to some and villain to others, seemed genuinely surprised when told that a memo by FBI director Louis Freeh appears to indicate his organization had an operative inside Elohim City, a Christian Identity compound near Muldrow, only two days before the Oklahoma bombing. But Dees doesn’t deny that was the case.

“We work very closely with the CIA, FBI, ATF,” he said. “I think I owe them my life. On many occasions, they’ve tipped us off to people who were out there (intending to bomb or kill Dees).”

In his landmark civil rights work, Dees has made lots of enemies over the years.

“A lot of hate groups don’t like me. I’ll tell you…when you put them out of business and take their double-wides (mobile homes), they don’t like it. We’ve sued a lot of these vicious hate groups over the years.”


Morris Dees (seated at left), co-founder of the Southern Poverty Law Center, meets with reporters before a recent speech at Southeastern Oklahoma State University, Durant. Watching on at left are his security team and SOSU president Glen Johnson. (Staff photo)

Indeed. In 1979, the Montgomery-Ala.-based center Dees co-founded with Joseph J. Levin Jr. brought its first civil suit against a major Ku Klux Klan organization when Klansmen attacked a civil rights gathering.

Using civil suits, the Southern Poverty Law Center has bankrupted several major Klan organizations and drawn national attention to white supremacist activity.

Today, Dees travels with armed bodyguards in his entourage, as he did last month when he came to Durant to speak at Southeastern Oklahoma State University.

Before that speech, he sat down with reporters from this newspaper and two other news organizations.

Dees was very guarded in his comments about Elohim City and refused to discuss one of its former residents, Andreas Carl Strassmeir, altogether.

“ I can’t go into that,” he said.

Unlike the FBI, Dees said “(Timothy) McVeigh probably was at Elohim City, based on evidence we’ve been able to pick up – stuff I really can’t go into.”

But like the FBI, he doubts Elohim City had any connection to the Oklahoma City bombing.

“If we’d been able to tie it back to Elohim City, we’d be owning that property today, but I don’t think the entire connection is really there,” he said.

Dees said his organization warned the FBI in the months before the Oklahoma City bombing that something big was afoot.

“We did notify the FBI and Janet Reno six months before the Oklahoma bombing that we had strong information that there’s going to be a serious domestic terrorism strike.

“Within minutes after it hit the news screens about Oklahoma, we called the head of the criminal division of the FBI and said to quit looking at Muslim businessmen who visited Oklahoma. You’d better be looking at people involved in this patriot movement.”

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FBI Director's memo Full Of surprises
http://www.mccurtain.com/FBI%20Director's%20memo.htm

By J.D. Cash and Lt. Col. Roger Charles (U.S. Marine Corps Ret.) Copyright 2003 by McCurtain Daily Gazette



The McCurtain Daily Gazette has obtained an unclassified copy of a memorandum marked From the Director of the FBI containing several new facts that could impact the upcoming state murder trial of Terry Nichols, scheduled to begin March 1 in McAlester.

The electronic message was sent to the OKBOMB investigation task force and a select group of FBI offices around the nation some eight months after the 1995 federal building bombing in Oklahoma City left 168 dead.

The potentially explosive contents of the teletype, among other things, exposes an informant operation being conducted by nationally known civil rights lawyer Morris Dees through his organization the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC).

Exposed for the first time, the FBI acknowledged the SPLC was engaged in an undercover role where they monitored subjects for the FBI believed to be linked to executed bomber Timothy McVeigh, the white supremacist compound at Elohim City and the mysterious German national Andreas Carl Strassmeir.

Dated Jan. 4, 1996, the four-page cable was drafted and issued under the authority of FBI director Louis Freeh and is heavily redacted (portions blacked out).

Despite these redactions, the document clearly describes individuals the FBI believed were associated with the OKBOMB and BOMBROB cases – two high profile domestic terrorism cases the FBI was investigating as possibly connected.

Many of the details in this potentially explosive document have never been made public before.

The OKBOMB case focused several hundred FBI agents on the truck bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City on April 19, 1995.

The FBI’s BOMBROB investigation was much smaller. It involved a wide-ranging search for a group of neo-Nazi bank robbers in the mid-1990s whose stated goal was the overthrow of the U.S. government through violence.

Only days after the Jan. 4, 1996, cable was sent, the first two arrests were made in the BOMBROB case. Within 13 months of the electronic message, four more persons were jailed in connection with 22 bank robberies the radical rightwing group participated in across seven Midwestern states.

Each of the six individuals arrested in the BOMBROB case had ties to Elohim City, a Christian Identity paramilitary training camp near Muldrow.

Only two persons have ever been charged in the Oklahoma City bombing – the 20th Century’s most brutal act of domestic terrorism that left 149 adults and 19 children dead.

In 1997, McVeigh was found guilty and executed in 2001 for his role in the crime.

Nichols, McVeigh’s co-conspirator, is serving a life sentence handed down by a federal judge in 1998.

It is widely believed that when Nichols goes on trial in McAlester – facing an additional 161-counts of first-degree murder – his lawyers will point the finger at other conspirators who they believe can be linked to McVeigh and the bombing in Oklahoma City conspiracy. MORE......

The McCurtain Daily Gazette has obtained an unclassified copy of a memorandum marked From the Director of the FBI containing several new facts that could impact the upcoming state murder trial of Terry Nichols, scheduled to begin March 1 in McAlester.

The electronic message was sent to the OKBOMB investigation task force and a select group of FBI offices around the nation some eight months after the 1995 federal building bombing in Oklahoma City left 168 dead.

The potentially explosive contents of the teletype, among other things, exposes an informant operation being conducted by nationally known civil rights lawyer Morris Dees through his organization the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC).

Exposed for the first time, the FBI acknowledged the SPLC was engaged in an undercover role where they monitored subjects for the FBI believed to be linked to executed bomber Timothy McVeigh, the white supremacist compound at Elohim City and the mysterious German national Andreas Carl Strassmeir.

Dated Jan. 4, 1996, the four-page cable was drafted and issued under the authority of FBI director Louis Freeh and is heavily redacted (portions blacked out).

Despite these redactions, the document clearly describes individuals the FBI believed were associated with the OKBOMB and BOMBROB cases – two high profile domestic terrorism cases the FBI was investigating as possibly connected.

Many of the details in this potentially explosive document have never been made public before.

The OKBOMB case focused several hundred FBI agents on the truck bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City on April 19, 1995.

The FBI’s BOMBROB investigation was much smaller. It involved a wide-ranging search for a group of neo-Nazi bank robbers in the mid-1990s whose stated goal was the overthrow of the U.S. government through violence.

Only days after the Jan. 4, 1996, cable was sent, the first two arrests were made in the BOMBROB case. Within 13 months of the electronic message, four more persons were jailed in connection with 22 bank robberies the radical rightwing group participated in across seven Midwestern states.

Each of the six individuals arrested in the BOMBROB case had ties to Elohim City, a Christian Identity paramilitary training camp near Muldrow.

Only two persons have ever been charged in the Oklahoma City bombing – the 20th Century’s most brutal act of domestic terrorism that left 149 adults and 19 children dead.

In 1997, McVeigh was found guilty and executed in 2001 for his role in the crime.

Nichols, McVeigh’s co-conspirator, is serving a life sentence handed down by a federal judge in 1998.

It is widely believed that when Nichols goes on trial in McAlester – facing an additional 161-counts of first-degree murder – his lawyers will point the finger at other conspirators who they believe can be linked to McVeigh and the bombing in Oklahoma City conspiracy.
Director warns of plan for Strassmeir’s escape

In the Jan. 4, 1996, document from the director, sketchy details of a plan are provided regarding an escape by a key subject wanted for questioning in the OKBOMB case. Facts would later emerge that this key individual also roomed with several members of the bank robbery gang rounded-up during the BOMBROB investigation.

Although his name was redacted, the key subject in the electronic message was Andreas Carl Strassmeir. He was a person the FBI officially listed as “possibly armed and may be dangerous” and who the director expected to cross the Mexican border “in the near future.”

Inexplicably, none of the offices that received this memo were in the state of Texas where Strassmeir had just arrived and was expected to make his escape across the Mexican border.

Other documents obtained by this newspaper indicate Strassmeir entered Mexico within a very short time of the director’s statements predicting the move. Strassmeir made his way to Germany and the safety of his politically connected family in Berlin.

Equally difficult to understand, FBI agents apparently did not go to a residence in North Carolina noted in the electronic message where Strassmeir had been staying with a friend prior to his escape from the U.S.

This newspaper first reported that Strassmeir had been singled out for arrest by the ATF in early 1995, but those plans were thwarted by the Oklahoma City FBI office.

The Tulsa ATF office sought an arrest warrant in early 1995 for Strassmeir after an informant, Carol E. Howe, told them about a plot at Elohim City to bomb federal installations, commit mass shootings and kill large numbers of Americans.

Ms. Howe identified Strassmeir as one of the ringleaders in the plot.

Tulsa ATF officials were able to determine that the heavily armed German national was an illegal overstay on his travel visa, therefore subject to arrest on a host of charges.

However, last minute efforts by then-FBI special agent in charge of the Oklahoma City field office, Bob Ricks, scrubbed plans for Strassmeir’s arrest when the FBI agent contacted U.S. Attorney Steve Lewis in Tulsa and complained about the ATF plan to raid Elohim City.

When this newspaper discovered documents confirming the FBI interdiction, Ricks sought to explain his actions by saying he successfully lobbied against Strassmeir’s arrest in late February of 1995 because he wanted to avoid another Waco-style disaster by the ATF.

Months after the Oklahoma bombing, Strassmeir fled Elohim City and began hiding in Black Mountain, North Carolina. after this newspaper discovered and reported on a phone call to Elohim City from McVeigh was linked to him.
Nichols not a conspirator?

Also contained in the four-page document is a remarkable statement that raises doubts about the FBI’s belief that Nichols was a conspirator in the OKBOMB case.

Regarding this revelation, the memo again describes the telephone call widely believed to have been made by McVeigh to Elohim City where Strassmeir and several members of a bank robbery gang were living on April 5, 1995.

The FBI director makes the following observation:

“Prior OKBOMB investigation determined that (name redacted) had placed a telephone call to (name redacted) on 4/5/95 a day that he was believed to have been attempting to recruit a second conspirator to assist in the OKBOMB attack.”(Emphasis added)

Thus, a plain reading of the Jan. 4, 1996, memo suggests the FBI director did not believe a second conspirator in the bombing existed on April 5, 1995 – an embarrassing admission, indeed, considering that during two trials in 1997, federal prosecutors argued that Nichols was deeply involved in the bomb plot dating back to Sept. of 1994.
Morris Dees’ informant?

Also disclosed for the first time are references by the FBI director to an informant working for the Birmingham, Alabama-based Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC), headed by civil right’s attorney Morris Dees and who was present at Elohim City in the critical hours leading up to the bombing in Oklahoma City.

Referring to a telephone call on April 17, 1995 (alleged to have been from McVeigh), the memo states: “(Name redacted) telephone call from (name redacted) on or about 4/17/95, two days prior to the OKBOMB attack, when (name redacted) of the SPLC, was in the white supremacist compound at (redacted), Oklahoma, notes the director. (Emphasis added)

References to an informant working for the SPLC at Elohim City on the eve of the Oklahoma City bombing raises serious questions as to what the SPLC might know about McVeigh’s activities during the final hours before the fuse was lit in Oklahoma City – but which the SPLC has failed to disclose publicly.

Questioned during a press conference at Southeastern Oklahoma State University in Durant recently, Dees confirmed someone from his organization was inside the white supremacist compound at Elohim City on April 17, 1995.

“If I told you what we were doing there, I would have to kill you,” Dees replied when pressed to explain what this person was doing at a terrorist training camp.

Dees did acknowledge that his information network long ago established that McVeigh had been to Elohim City before the bombing.

“But we didn’t have him on our radar screen until he was arrested,” Dees said.

Dees has written a number of books and articles about the militia movement in this country.

Many have criticized Dees’ attacks on right-wing militias and gun owners in the U.S. as inaccurate, exploitive and designed to get donations to his tax-exempt foundation, which receives substantial contributions each year.

The director’s electronic message also alludes to a person at the Oklahoma white supremacist compound described by the FBI head as a subject with an allegedly, “…. lengthy relationship with one of the two indicted OKBOMB conspirators (emphasis added).”

John Millar, a church elder at Elohim City, told the McCurtain Daily Gazette, “I don’t know who was out here back then. It doesn’t surprise me that a bunch of Jews that work for Dees and that Southern Poverty (SPLC) bunch would be spying on us. They don’t understand our message or anything about us. Why don’t you ever write about the fact that no one has ever found a link to McVeigh here?”

Until this memo surfaced, spokespersons for the FBI and the U.S. Department of Justice steadfastly denied they had any reliable information concerning any relationship between either McVeigh or Nichols and subjects living at or who had frequented the Elohim City compound before the bombing.

Attorney Stephen Jones, who represented McVeigh at trial in Denver, Colo., said he was not provided this information from the government despite repeated motions filed with the court.

“We filed motions with the judge specifically asking for details of surveillance activities at Elohim City and other places. We were told by prosecutors that they had no records. Now you have some of them,

 


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