------------------------------------------------------------------------------ NewsBank, inc. - The Arizona Republic - 1995 - Article with Citation ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Source: THE PHOENIX GAZETTE Headline: 2 ARRESTED IN BOMBING ONE MAN MIGHT BE 'JOHN DOE 2' Date: May 2, 1995 Section: Front Edition: Final Page: A1 Word Count: 1166 Author: By Sally Streff Buzbee, The Associated Press; Includes information from the Los Angeles Times. Dateline: OKLAHOMA CITY Index Terms: OKLAHOMA EXPLOSION DISASTER ARREST MULTIPLE Text: Heavily armed FBI agents on a nationwide manhunt for ''John Doe No. 2'' captured two men at a Missouri motel at daybreak today after their car was spotted in the parking lot. Gary Allen Land of Arizona and Robert Jacks of Oklahoma - the subject of an FBI all-points bulletin - were arrested without incident as material witnesses in the Oklahoma City bombing. Asked if the heavyset, square-jawed Land could be ''John Doe No. 2,'' the second suspect in the nation's worst domestic terrorist attack, FBI spokesman Dan Vogel said: ''We don't know that. We have not determined whether he is or not.'' However, some of Land's movements appear to have paralleled those of Timothy McVeigh, the first suspect arrested in the attack. The FBI captured the two men after evacuating other guests at the motel, staking out the place overnight and phoning their room at daybreak. The men walked out and surrendered. In Washington, Attorney General Janet Reno refused to say whether Jacks and Land were suspects in the bombing or if either was believed to be ''Doe 2.'' The two men were expected to appear before a federal magistrate today. A federal grand jury, meanwhile, was believed to be meeting on McVeigh's case in Oklahoma City. Authorities refused to confirm that it was meeting or to say where. Authorities also refused to confirm various reports, including statements from a Wisconsin couple who operate a military surplus store who say they were subpoenaed to appear. The death toll in the April 19 blast stood at 139, including 15 children. At least 40 people are missing. The Missouri Highway Patrol was alerted by the FBI to watch for a white 1981 Ford Thunderbird with an Arizona license plate around Joplin. Sgt. Rick Baird spotted the vehicle at the Kel Lake Motel in nearby Carthage about 9 p.m. Monday and questioned the two men, Highway Patrol Sgt. Archie Dunn said. The car being sought was registered in Arizona to Land. Land and Jacks stayed for five months at a motel in Kingman, a town frequented by McVeigh. The FBI surrounded the eight-unit, one-story brick motel and moved the guests out of two other units, said Gene Jackson, son of the motel's owners. Lee Snyder was delivering newspapers across the street from the Kel Lake Motel about 5:30 a.m. when he noticed a swarm of state and federal officers surrounding the motel. He watched as officers placed a call from the motel office, then watched two men walk out. ''As the door opened, I could hear one of the officers yell, 'Put your hands in the air! If you make a move, we'll blow you away.' Those were his exact words,'' Snyder said. Also today, a New York congressman's office reported that McVeigh wrote to him three years ago complaining that state law prohibited possession of ''noxious substances'' and ''stun guns.'' ''I strongly believe in a God-given right to self-defense,'' McVeigh wrote in the Feb. 16, 1992, letter to Rep. John LaFalce, D-N.Y. ''Should any other person or governing body be able to tell another person that he (or) she can't save their own life.'' LaFalce said the letter was discovered through a search of his computerized correspondence files. The original letter and its envelope were given to the FBI last Tuesday, he said. At the time it was sent, McVeigh lived near Lockport, N.Y., in LaFalce's district. He said in the letter that he was prompted to write by an article on the arrest of a man for possession of a self-defense spray. The New York Times reported today that men believed to be Land and Jacks checked into a motel in Perry, Okla., the town were McVeigh was being held on an unrelated traffic violation, the day after the bombing. The paper said they checked out that same day. A motel manager in Vinita, Okla., says two men believed to be Land and Jacks checked into his motel April 19, the afternoon of the bombing. Tom Crafton, manager of Deward and Pauline's motel in Vinita, said the men checked back in April 20 and stayed at least until the evening of April 24. Crafton said he joked with one of the two men, telling him that he looked like ''Doe 2.'' ''I just saw your picture on television,'' Crafton said he told the man. ''He just grinned.'' Vinita is 180 miles northeast of Oklahoma City on Interstate 44; Carthage is 60 miles to the northeast of Vinita on the interstate. Edna Mendez, who answered the phone at Jacks' home in the Oklahoma City suburb of Moore, said that he works for the Loomis armored car service. He made a delivery in downtown Oklahoma City minutes before the bombing, she said. She said that Jacks also voluntarily contacted the FBI to report seeing a ''Ryder truck.'' Meanwhile, convinced there was almost no chance someone was still alive in the wreckage of the Alfred Murrah Federal Building, rescue workers turned to machinery to search for bodies. A huge backhoe mounted on tracks like a bulldozer was to lift debris from inside the ruins and set it down outside, where it will be searched by hand, Assistant Fire Chief Jon Hansen said. Hansen said he told families that ''there are some people we probably won't find.'' On Monday, the FBI released a revised sketch of ''Doe 2,'' believed to be the man with McVeigh on April 17 in Junction City, Kan., when McVeigh allegedly rented the truck that carried the bomb. Two buddies of his, brothers James and Terry Nichols, have been charged separately by federal authorities in Michigan with conspiring with McVeigh to make and detonate small bombs on James Nichols' farm in Decker, Mich. The Nichols aren't charged in the Oklahoma City case, and McVeigh isn't charged in the Michigan case. A bond hearing for James Nichols was to continue today. His brother is being held without bond. Graphic: Drawings (2) Photo by The Associated Press Photo by Michael Chow / THE PHOENIX GAZETTE Color photo by Michael Chow / THE PHOENIX GAZETTE Color map by Rob Weideman / THE PHOENIX GAZETTE (see microfilm) NOTE: BOMBING IN OKLAHOMA CITY: Terror in the heartland Caption: One of two men arrested by the FBI in connection with the Oklahoma City bombing is Gary A. Land (left), who lived in Kingman and Mesa. Land may be ''John Doe No. 2,'' shown in FBI sketches (below). Kingman resident Robert Spencer says he often ran into Gary A. Land and Robert Jacks, who are wanted for questioning in connection with the Oklahoma City bombing. FBI agents Monday inspect a trailer in Kingman that belongs to Michael Fortier, a friend of Oklahoma City bombing suspect Timothy McVeigh. The trail of Land and Jacks Memo: Photo reprints available. Please call (602) 271-8298 for cost information. Copyright 1995 Phoenix Newspapers Inc. Accession Number: 9505020480 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ NewsBank, inc. - The Arizona Republic - 1995 - Article with Citation ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Source: THE PHOENIX GAZETTE Headline: FBI TARGETS MOTEL, TRAILER IN KINGMAN Date: May 2, 1995 Section: Front Edition: Final Page: A1 Word Count: 753 Author: By Dennis Wagner, THE PHOENIX GAZETTE; Includes information from The Associated Press. Dateline: KINGMAN Index Terms: OKLAHOMA EXPLOSION DISASTER INVESTIGATE KINGMAN Text: FBI agents on Monday repeatedly questioned the owner of a motel in Kingman about former tenants Gary Allen Land and Robert Jacks, seized records and sealed off three rooms used by the men. Bill Terranova, owner of the El Trovatore Motel said agents questioned him and his wife, June, four times about the two, who were arrested early today in connection with the Oklahoma City bombing. They stayed at the motel from Nov. 3 until April 4. The Terranovas said they were able to identify photographs of Land, but could not match an FBI snapshot with Jacks. Land and Jacks were the subject of a nationwide search after authorities released information about the white Thunderbird with Arizona license plates they were driving. The two were arrested in Carthage, Mo. El Trovatore is a block away from the Imperial and Hilltop hotels, where bombing suspect Timothy McVeigh stayed shortly before the April 19 explosion that killed at least 139 people. Jacks told Terranova and his wife that he was Land's uncle. The two men also claimed they were going to Oklahoma when they departed, according to the couple. Bill Terranova said Jacks claimed to be retired and seldom left his room except to buy beer or drive to Needles, Calif., to get a pension check that covered his $500 monthly rent. Robert Spencer, a handyman at the motel, said Land wore a Los Angeles Raiders cap and lifted weights, while Jacks preferred a New York Yankees cap. Otherwise, there wasn't much distinctive about them. Meanwhile, across town, nearly a score of agents armed with shotguns, automatic weapons and evidence kits swarmed over the residence of Michael Fortier as darkness fell, crawling beneath the mobile home and hauling boxes out the front door. Fortier has been identified as a friend and former Army comrade of McVeigh, the lone suspect in custody. McVeigh listed Fortier's north Kingman address on McVicar Avenue as his own in some documents. Neighbors and other witnesses said Fortier left his residence just minutes before the FBI and Mohave County sheriff's deputies descended on the property Monday evening. The FBI declined comment, and it was unclear whether Fortier is a suspect and whether he was taken into custody. What is known is that his home had been under surveillance by aircraft and by FBI agents on the ground for at least the past three days. The residence is hard to miss because a U.S. flag flies on a pole outside, along with a banner reading ''Don't Tread on Me.'' Fortier was seen working beneath the mobile home the past two days, and federal agents searched there. Meanwhile, Fortier's next-door neighbor, James Rosencrans, was arrested on suspicion of disorderly conduct when he fled on foot at the outset of the raid. Jackie Young, who lives across the street, said she saw Rosencrans go out the door. ''He was walking fast. They (agents) stayed back from him because it was obvious he had a rifle over his shoulder. It looked like he had a vest on and an ammo belt.'' Although Rosencrans has been described as an associate of Fortier, the Sheriff's Office issued a statement saying his arrest ''had nothing to do with the FBI investigation.'' Meanwhile, outside Junction City, Kan., where the Ryder truck that carried the bomb was rented, agents searched the woods and sent divers into Geary State Fishing Lake. They sought evidence that bomb materials were mixed nearby and equipment used in the mixing were tossed into the water. The search was prompted by witness reports of a Ryder truck at the site after April 17, the day McVeigh allegedly rented a Ryder truck, a senior federal official said in Washington. McVeigh is being held on charges of building the ammonium nitrate and fuel oil bomb that exploded in front of the federal building in the worst domestic terrorist attack in U.S. history. Investigators have found a receipt for 1 ton of ammonium nitrate in a search of Terry Nichols' house in Herington, Kan., the Washington official said. The receipt bore a fingerprint of McVeigh's, the official said. The receipt could establish a link between the bombing and Nichols, a friend of McVeigh's being held as a material witness. Copyright 1995 Phoenix Newspapers Inc. Accession Number: 9505020482 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ NewsBank, inc. - The Arizona Republic - 1995 - Article with Citation ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Source: THE PHOENIX GAZETTE Headline: ARRESTED MAN LIVED IN MESA Date: May 2, 1995 Section: Front Edition: Final Page: A1 Word Count: 637 Author: By Richard Ruelas, THE PHOENIX GAZETTE Index Terms: OKLAHOMA ARREST EXPLOSION MESA Text: Gary Allen Land didn't do much but eat, drink and lift weights during the eight months he lived in a Mesa trailer park, according to a woman who said she was his neighbor. A man who Opal Hancock, 69, said was Land rented the gray trailer in space No. 30 from spring to November 1993. That trailer, in the Copper State Motel and Trailer Park, in the 600 block of East Main Street in Mesa was the address Land gave for his Arizona driver's license. Land and Robert Jacks were taken into custody early today after their car was spotted at a motel in Carthage, Mo. An all-points bulletin for them and the 1981 Ford Thunderbird had been issued after reportedly being seen at a motel in Oklahoma on the night of the bombing. The FBI refused to comment on the arrests. Hancock said she didn't get along with the man she knew as ''Gary.'' He didn't like the many police stickers on her window and called her names. She said she retorted with names of her own. ''I called them gay guys,'' Hancock said of Land and his 40ish trailer-mate, who had a touch of gray in his hair. ''Me and (Land) fussed and fought.'' On Saturday and Sunday, the FBI visited Copper State's 23 motel rooms and 31 trailer spaces. They interviewed Alan Patelter, a desk clerk, and Doris Nelson, the owner of the trailer in space No. 30. Both said agents showed them three photographs of a man. Neither was able to recognize him. Agents didn't talk to Hancock. Patelter said he started working at the trailer park in 1994 -- after Land supposedly lived there. Nelson, who didn't buy the trailer until after Land supposedly moved out, said she couldn't see the occupants too well because the trailer she lives in is hidden in the back of the lot. Nelson said the men drove a large car, but said she didn't think it was a Thunderbird. But when Hancock was shown a photo of Land's driver's license by a TV news crew, she said he was the combative loner who lived across from her. ''That definitely is him,'' Hancock said Monday night, between spits of chewing tobacco. Hancock said she and Land called the police on each other, but Mesa police said they must have been minor incidents because they have no record of being out there. Hancock said the two men didn't appear to have jobs. ''They didn't go anywhere except to the store. They drank two cases of beer a day,'' said Hancock. Police records show that Land was arrested July 31, 1993, and accused of shoplifting at a Mesa grocery store. After failing to appear at his first court date, Land pleaded guilty June 2 to damaging property at the store, 450 S. Country Club Drive. He was fined $112 for the misdemeanor offense. The owner of the trailer in which Land is supposed to have lived is Lloyd Daniels of Apache Junction. His phone was not answered Monday night. Nelson, 71, said FBI agents told her that Daniels recognized one of the three photos. Nelson said agents asked her if she particularly recognized one of the three photos -- a black and white head shot of a man. Agents didn't ask to enter the trailer, which is vacant, but had been rented out once since Nelson has owned it. Nelson is trying to remodel the trailer to get it ready to rent again. Graphic: Photo by T.J. Sokol / The Associated Press NOTE: BOMBING IN OKLAHOMA CITY: Terror in the heartland Caption: A man arrested today for questioning in connection with the Oklahoma City bombing is believed to have lived in this trailer at the Copper State Motel and Trailer Park in Mesa in 1993. A neighbor says she and Gary A. Land ''fussed and fought.'' Copyright 1995 Phoenix Newspapers Inc. Accession Number: 9505020484 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ NewsBank, inc. - The Arizona Republic - 1995 - Article with Citation ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Source: THE PHOENIX GAZETTE Headline: 2 ARRESTED IN BOMBING ONE MAN MIGHT BE 'JOHN DOE 2' Date: May 2, 1995 Section: Front Edition: Midday Page: A1 Word Count: 1082 Author: Compiled by THE PHOENIX GAZETTE; Includes information from GAZETTE reporter Dennis Wagner and The Associated Press. Index Terms: OKLAHOMA EXPLOSION INVESTIGATE ARREST KINGMAN Text: Two men being sought as witnesses in the Oklahoma City bombing were taken into custody today in southwestern Missouri after their car was spotted in a motel parking lot, authorities said. Gary Allen Land and Robert Jacks were arrested without incident on material witness warrants issued in connection with the bombing, FBI spokesman Dan Vogel said in Oklahoma City. He refused to give further details. FBI agents secured the area around a motel on the east end of Carthage, Mo., before they entered a guest room and took the men into custody, Highway Patrol Sgt. Archie Dunn said in Carthage. The arrests occurred after a white Thunderbird with an Arizona license plate was spotted by a Missouri trooper in the motel's parking lot. A nationwide alert had been issued for the two men. Land and Jacks reportedly checked briefly into a motel in Perry, Okla., the day after the April 19 bombing. Perry is where bombing suspect Timothy McVeigh was arrested. Although authorities have said the two men were witnesses, a federal source, discussing an all-points bulletin that had been issued for Land, said flatly, ''This is 'John Doe No. 2.' '' Asked Monday about the all-points bulletin, FBI agent Weldon Kennedy had said, ''That is one of hundreds of leads, literally thousands of leads, that we are pursuing. We are attempting to locate that automobile and the individuals.'' In Washington, a senior law-enforcement official described Land as ''one of numerous John Doe number two leads.'' He said the bulletin was only the second issued since the bombing -- the other was for the Arizona license plate missing from the car in which McVeigh was arrested. Part of the hunt for the men had shifted to Kingman, where Bill Terranova, owner of El Trovatore Motel, said agents questioned him and his wife, June, four times Monday about former tenants Land and Jacks. The agents also collected records and sealed off three rooms used by the men. Jacks and Land stayed at El Trovatore from Nov. 3 until April 4. The two men were driving a white, 1981 Ford Thunderbird with Arizona license plate JWK-923. El Trovatore is one block away from the Imperial and Hilltop hotels, where McVeigh stayed shortly before the April 19 explosion that killed at least 139 people. Terranova and his wife said Jacks said he was Land's uncle, and the two men claimed they were going to Oklahoma when they departed. LAND'S DESCRIPTION The Terranovas and handyman Robert Spencer said Land is a short, muscular man, about 28, with olive complexion and brown hair. Those features resemble a description of ''Doe No. 2,'' a suspect who was seen at the bombing sight and has been sought by FBI agents for two weeks. The FBI hoped a third sketch of ''Doe No. 2,'' who was with McVeigh when he allegedly rented the truck, might bring new leads. In the new, profile view, the suspect appears stocky and wears a baseball cap. He is very tan and muscular and might be a weightlifter, Kennedy said. The Terranovas said they were able to identify photos of Land, but could not match an FBI snapshot with Jacks, who is said to be in his 50s with gray hair and and an average build. Bill Terranova said Jacks claimed to be retired and seldom left his room except to buy beer or drive to Needles, Calif., to get a pension check that covered his $500 monthly rent. Spencer, the handyman, said Land wore a Los Angeles Raiders cap and lifted weights, while Jacks preferred a New York Yankees cap. Otherwise, there wasn't much distinctive about them. Meanwhile, across town nearly a score of agents armed with shotguns, automatic weapons and evidence kits swarmed over the residence of Michael Fortier as darkness fell, crawling beneath the mobile home and hauling boxes out the front door. FRIEND OF MCVEIGH Fortier has been identified as a friend and former Army comrade of McVeigh, the lone suspect in custody. McVeigh listed Fortier's north Kingman address on McVicar Avenue as his own in some documents. Neighbors and other witnesses said Fortier left his residence just minutes before the FBI and Mohave County sheriff's deputies descended on the property Monday evening. The FBI declined comment, and it was unclear whether Fortier is a suspect and whether he was taken into custody. What is known is that his home had been under surveillance by aircraft and FBI agents on the ground for at least three days. The residence is hard to miss because a U.S. flag flies on a pole outside, along with a banner reading ''Don't Tread on Me.'' Meanwhile, Fortier's next-door neighbor, James Rosencrans, was arrested on suspicion of disorderly conduct when he fled on foot at the outset of the raid. Jackie Young, who lives across the street, said she saw Rosencrans go out the door. ''He was walking fast. They (agents) stayed back from him because it was obvious he had a rifle over his shoulder. It looked like he had a vest on and an ammo belt.'' Although Rosencrans has been described as an associate of Fortier, the Sheriff's Office issued a statement saying that his arrest ''had nothing to do with the FBI investigation.'' Meanwhile, outside Junction City, Kan., where the Ryder truck that carried the bomb was rented, agents searched the woods and sent divers into Geary State Fishing Lake. They seek evidence that bomb materials were mixed near-by and equipment used for it were thrown into the water. The search was prompted by witness reports of a Ryder truck at the site after April 17, the day McVeigh allegedly rented the Ryder truck, a senior federal official in Washington said. McVeigh is under arrest on charges of building the ammonium nitrate and fuel oil bomb that exploded in front of the federal building in the worst domestic terrorist attack in U.S. history. Graphic: Color photo by THE PHOENIX GAZETTE NOTE: BOMBING IN OKLAHOMA CITY: Terror in the heartland Caption: Two men the FBI believe may have been associated with the Oklahoma City bombing stayed at the El Trovatore Motel in Kingman until about two weeks before the explosion. Memo: Photo reprints available. Please call (602) 271-8298 for cost information. Copyright 1995 Phoenix Newspapers Inc. Accession Number: 9505020486 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ NewsBank, inc. - The Arizona Republic - 1995 - Article with Citation ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Source: THE PHOENIX GAZETTE Headline: NO ONE LEFT TO RESCUE FBI RELEASES PROFILE SKETCH OF 'JOHN DOE NO. 2' Date: May 1, 1995 Section: Front Edition: Final Page: A1 Word Count: 775 Author: By Rochelle Hines, The Associated Press Dateline: OKLAHOMA CITY Index Terms: EXPLOSION OKLAHOMA CITY INVESTIGATE Text: The FBI today released a new sketch of the man sought in the federal building bombing, giving the public a profile view of the suspect known as ''John Doe No. 2.'' The announcement came as rescue workers prepared to turn the task of removing the remains of some 60 people missing in the blast to machines that can safely clear rubble from the shaky shell of the building. FBI Special Agent Weldon Kennedy displayed a sketch of a stocky man in a baseball cap seen at the scene of the April 19 blast with Timothy McVeigh, who is charged with the nation's most deadly act of terrorism. Kennedy provided a few new tidbits of information: John Doe No. 2 is ''very tan'' and muscular, and may be a weightlifter. ''He should be considered armed and very dangerous,'' Kennedy said. Another lead emerged when Arizona state police announced the FBI is looking for an Arizona license plate registered to a man believed to be a possible witness to the bombing. Arizona plate JWK-923, is believed to belong to a 1981 White Thunderbird driven by Gary Allen Land, said Sgt. Dave Myers, spokesman for the Arizona Department of Public Safety. He was last seen at a hotel in Vinita, Okla., Myers said. Tom Crafton, manager of Deward and Pauline's motel in Vinita, said FBI agents came in car and in helicopter Saturday night to ''check out a guy who had been here.'' Crafton says the man they were looking for stayed the night of the bombing. The death toll rose to 137, including 15 children. Fifty people are officially listed as missing. Fire Chief Gary Marrs said a huge backhoe would be brought in to drag the pulverized remains of the upper floors of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building clear of the building's dangerously unstable skeleton. Marrs refused to acknowledge the change means rescuers have given up hope of finding anyone alive 12 days after the blast. However, Gov. Frank Keating, who has been preparing Oklahomans for the possibility for several days, said late Sunday night that rescuers had ''crossed the river'' and had accepted the inevitability that everyone inside is dead. Concern now is for the safety of the crews that have been sifting by hand through the pulverized rubble of the building despite the threat that parts of the structure could collapse on them. ''You reach a point where you don't jeopardize human beings in order to extract the dead,'' Keating said. He said machines would begin work within a day or two. Rescue workers support the decision, said Oklahoma City police Sgt. Lynn McCumber. ''This thing's gone on for 12 days now, and we've dug through that by hand,'' McCumber said. ''We need to bring an end to this.'' Keating said that even after heavy equipment is used to extract bodies, up to 20 sets of remains may still be buried in the bombed-out shell of the building. Against long odds, rescuers had held out hope they might come across a nook or cranny in the debris that could shelter human life. But the blast so thoroughly pulverized the north face of the building that it left no such crevice, the governor said. Keating was asked how he would console the families of those whose remains may never be recovered. ''They are in paradise now,'' he said. ''That is a very significant comfort.'' Rescuers on Sunday crept gingerly through the debris as engineers tried to reinforce two weakened columns that threatened to collapse. More than 20 engineers were examining cracks and other signs of weakness in the building. Six people were added to the list of missing Sunday after a Tulsa woman reported her relatives may have been trapped in the building. Authorities now believe the six may have been located but refused to elaborate. The Dallas Morning News reported today that a receipt for a ton of ammonium nitrate was found at the home of Terry Nichols and bears McVeigh's fingerprints. Authorities told the paper the receipt appears to establish a link tying Nichols, a friend of McVeigh's who is being held as a material witness in the case. He has been charged separately with federal explosives violations in Michigan, along with his brother, James. Graphic: Drawing NOTE: BOMBING IN OKLAHOMA CITY: Terror in the heartland Caption: The Oklahoma City bombing suspect known as ''John Doe No. 2'' is very tan and muscular, and could be a weightlifter, according to the FBI. Copyright 1995 Phoenix Newspapers Inc. Accession Number: 9505020362 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ NewsBank, inc. - The Arizona Republic - 1995 - Article with Citation ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Source: THE PHOENIX GAZETTE Headline: MILITIA BOSS DENIES TIES TO MCVEIGH FBI SEEKS SECOND AZ LICENSE PLATE Date: May 1, 1995 Section: Front Edition: Final Page: A7 Word Count: 445 Author: By Eun-Kyung Kim, The Associated Press Dateline: KINGMAN Index Terms: EXPLOSION OKLAHOMA CITY Text: The leader of the Arizona Patriots militia says he never had met Oklahoma City bombing suspect Timothy McVeigh and never had seen the former Kingman resident until FBI agents recently showed him a picture. ''I don't approve of what this whatever-his-name-is McVeigh did,'' Jack Maxwell Oliphant told reporters Sunday from his Hephzibah Ranch, located on a remote 320-acre stretch of mountains about 15 miles from the nearest paved road. Oliphant, described by federal authorities as the leader of the Arizona Patriots, a right-wing militia, said the FBI questioned him about McVeigh last week when he went into town to pick up his mail. Oliphant and McVeigh rent boxes at The Mail Room, a private postal service in Kingman. Oliphant said agents also asked him if he knew John Doe No. 2, an unidentified suspect sought in the Oklahoma bombing. ''They wanted to know if he was up here,'' he said. ''I said, 'Hell no. It's just the ol' lady and me'.'' But a Kingman-area man who lived near McVeigh for a time said he believes John Doe 2 spent several days visiting McVeigh last year. Jack Gohn, 66, told The Arizona Republic he was ''99 percent sure'' the man he recognized from police sketches visited McVeigh in March and April 1994 at a home in Golden Valley, an unincorporated community about 10 miles northwest of Kingman. McVeigh lived there for only two months. Gohn said the visitor drove a Ford pickup with Michigan license plates. The FBI is also looking for another Arizona license plate, number JWK923, believed to belong to a 1981 White Thunderbird driven by Gary Allen Land, said Sgt. Dave Myers, spokesman for the Arizona Department of Public Safety. Investigators want to talk to Land as a possible witness to the Oklahoma City bombing. He was last seen at a hotel in Vinita, Okla. Oliphant said McVeigh, who many say was involved in paramilitary organizations, has done more to harm the work and image of militia groups than help them. ''All he's done is turn the whole people of the country against anybody, including myself, that don't like the government,'' he said. ''He's hurt everybody in the movement - I don't think he was in any movement.'' Oliphant was convicted of conspiracy in 1987 with two other people in a plan to bomb and rob an armored car carrying casino money to and from Laughlin. He served 3 1/2 years in prison on the conspiracy charge. Copyright 1995 Phoenix Newspapers Inc. Accession Number: 9505020399 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------