By Noah Shachtman
U.S. Air Force Using Russian Planes
Tue Sep 4, 2007 18:28
 

ALSO AS SEEN ON QUICK CLIP ON CNN / LOU DOBBS 9/4/07
U.S. Air Force Using Russian Planes
By Noah Shachtman
http://blog.wired.com/defense/2007/04/us_air_force_us.html

The U.S. and Russia may be snarling at each other like its '81 all over again. But, in a surprising number of instances, the American military actually relies on Russian companies' equipment -- especially their massive transport planes.

The other day, for example, "Airmen from the 129th Rescue Wing were deploying to Afghanistan and needed aircraft to transport [their] Pave Hawk rescue helicopters," the Air Force notes. American cargo planes were all tied up. "Enter the Russian Volga-Dnepr AN-124 long-range heavy transport aircraft." It's one of the world's largest, with around 15% more takeoff weight than the American C-5.

"Volga-Dnepr Airlines is a civilian company based out of Russia and has the world's largest fleet of AN-124 aircraft," the Air Force says. "In January 2002, Volga-Dnepr became the first civil aviation company to operate flights to Afghanistan."

Back in March, a Russian AN-26 "shipping frozen food and other goods to the main U.S. base in eastern Afghanistan ran off the runway." Luckily, no one was injured.

Russian planes handle domestic jobs, too. When rockets like the Atlas Vs have to be transported from the Lockheed plant in Colorado to Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, these transporters from our former adversaries get the call.

SOURCE W/LINKS:
http://blog.wired.com/defense/2007/04/us_air_force_us.html

==================================
Russian aircraft transports ANG rescue helicopters

Airmen from the 129th Rescue Wing load cargo onto a Russian Volga-Dnepr AN-124 long-range heavy transport aircraft April 21 at Moffett Federal Airfield, Calif. The contracted AN-124 transported 129th Rescue Wing deployment cargo to Afghanistan because the high operations tempos of Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom have kept C-17 Globemaster III and C-5 Galaxy aircraft fully engaged. (U.S. Air Force photo/Master Sgt. Daniel Kacir)
http://www.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123050091&page=2

by Capt. Alyson M. Teeter
129th Rescue Wing Public Affairs

4/24/2007 - MOFFETT AIR FIELD, Calif. (AFNEWS) -- Air National Guardsmen here worked with an aircraft that was vastly different from the MC-130P Combat Shadow tankers, HH-60G Pave Hawk rescue helicopters and other Air Force aircraft they are accustomed to.

Airmen from the 129th Rescue Wing were deploying to Afghanistan and needed aircraft to transport HH-60G Pave Hawk rescue helicopters. Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom have kept C-17 Globemaster III and C-5 Galaxy aircraft extremely busy, and the high operations tempo of these aircraft led to the scheduling of contracted cargo airlift, said Senior Master Sgt. Anthony Przymus, the Logistics Readiness Squadron Contingency Plans superintendent and Deployment Control Center logistics representative.

Enter the Russian Volga-Dnepr AN-124 long-range heavy transport aircraft.

The enormous white fuselage splashed with blue paint and Russian writing provided a rare sight for 129th Airmen.

"This was the first time the AN-124 hauled 129th cargo," Sergeant Przymus said.

Volga-Dnepr Airlines is a civilian company based out of Russia and has the world's largest fleet of AN-124 aircraft, according to its Web site. The AN-124's unique capabilities and loading equipment make it possible to transport out-sized and bulk cargo, like heavy engines, satellites and helicopters. In January 2002, Volga-Dnepr became the first civil aviation company to operate flights to Afghanistan.

Volga-Dnepr Airlines transports military aircraft, cargo and servicemembers all over the world, said Sergey Menashev, a radio operator for the AN-124 who has flown on the aircraft for more than 20 years.

"We airlift the military quite a bit and fly in to combat zones in Afghanistan," he said. "It's nice to be here in California."

After the aircraft landed and the air crew disembarked, the load crew got down to business. The nose of the plane opened up and the Russian and 129th load crews worked through a language barrier to solidify the load plan for the three Pave Hawk helicopters.

"Once they landed the crew wanted to load the cargo right away, which helped facilitate schedules," said 1st Lt. Mario Montero, the logistics readiness squadron installation deployment officer. "The crew was really friendly and timely."

With the nose cone up and the front end open, the Russian crew operated the winching equipment and 129th Airmen steered the helicopters up the ramp and in to the aircraft. The process required swift communication and coordination between the two crews.

While the crews loaded the helicopters, Tech. Sgt. John Szelog, a 129th Maintenance Squadron electronic countermeasures maintainer, curiously inspected the AN-124. He was one of the two 129th Airmen scheduled to fly on the aircraft.

"I'm looking forward to the flight -- it should be interesting," he said.

Three hours after the AN-124 landed, the helicopters were loaded and secured for the long journey to Afghanistan. But there was more work to be done.

A C-17, flown and operated by Air Force Reservists from McChord Air Force Base, Wash., was loaded with deploying 129th Air National Guardsmen during the helicopter loading. The AN-124 was parked near the C-17 on the tarmac.

Adding to the total force mix was an active duty tanker airlift control element from Travis AFB. The TALCE team provided necessary equipment to load the cargo aircraft. They also provided additional expertise preparing the cargo for proper air shipment.

In the end, the deployment of 129th Rescue Wing equipment and Air National Guardsmen was a resounding success because of the cooperation between Air National Guardsmen, Air Force Reservists, active Airmen and Russian civilians.

"This is a great example of our total Air Force at work," said Col. Wayne Albright, the 129th Rescue Wing vice commander. "The active duty, Guard and Reserve train to and work with the same standards making even the novelty of loading an AN-124 go effortlessly."

Comment on this story (comments may be published on Air Force Link)
http://www.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123050091&page=2

=================
Volga-Dnepr Airlines is the world's largest transporter of outsize and heavyweight air cargo. The airline has earned a 56% share of the global market in this specialist sector. With Scheduled and Air Charter licenses granted to Volga-Dnepr by more than 140 countries, the airline continues to prove its ability to provide air cargo solutions for customers to and from virtually any point of the globe.

10 Antonov AN-124-100 Ruslan aircraft form the backbone of Volga-Dnepr's fleet. Owing to its unique technical performance, the AN-124-100 is the unrivaled leader of the outsize and 'super heavy' air cargo transportation sector.
http://www.volga-dnepr.com/eng/group/biz/charter/

How to charter an aircraft?
http://www.volga-dnepr.com/eng/charter/how/

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