C-SPAN
Military Mental Health Treatment (PTSD)
Thu May 24, 2007 22:18
 

 
Suicide, PTSD, Mental Breakdowns and Unending Violence
Letters From Iraq
http://www.apfn.org/apfn/iraq_horror.htm

THIS WILL BREAK YOUR HEART....!!!

C-SPAN
Military Mental Health Treatment, Rep. Henry Wasman
http://www.cspan.org/watch/cs_cspan_rm.asp?Cat=TV&Code=CS

Post-traumatic stress disorder - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a term for certain severe psychological consequences of exposure to, or confrontation with, stressful events that ...

GOOGLE: PTSD


Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a term for certain severe psychological consequences of exposure to, or confrontation with, stressful events that the person experiences as highly traumatic.[1] Clinically, such events involve actual or threatened death, serious physical injury, or a threat to physical and/or psychological integrity, to a degree that usual psychological defenses are incapable of coping with the impact. It is occasionally called post-traumatic stress reaction to emphasize that it is a result of traumatic experience rather than a manifestation of a pre-existing psychological condition. The presence of a PTSD response is influenced by the intensity of the experience, its duration, and the individual person involved.

It is possible for individuals to experience traumatic stress without manifesting Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, as indicated in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, and also for people to experience traumatic situations and not develop PTSD. In fact, most people who experience traumatic events will not develop PTSD. For most people, the emotional effects of traumatic events tend to subside after several months. PTSD is thought to be primarily an anxiety disorder (possibly closely related to panic disorder) and should not be confused with normal grief and adjustment after traumatic events.

PTSD may be triggered by an external factor or factors. Its symptoms can include the following: nightmares, flashbacks, emotional detachment or numbing of feelings (emotional self-mortification or dissociation), insomnia, avoidance of reminders and extreme distress when exposed to the reminders ("triggers"), loss of appetite, irritability, hypervigilance, memory loss (may appear as difficulty paying attention), excessive startle response, clinical depression, and anxiety. It is also possible for a person suffering from PTSD to exhibit one or more other comorbid psychiatric disorders; these disorders often include clinical depression (or bipolar disorder), general anxiety disorder, and a variety of addictions.

Symptoms that appear within the first month of the trauma are called Acute stress disorder, not PTSD according to DSM-IV. If there is no improvement of symptoms after this period of time, PTSD is diagnosed. PTSD has three subforms: Acute PTSD subsides after a duration of three months. If the symptoms persist, the diagnosis is changed to chronic PTSD. The third subform is referred to as delayed onset PTSD which may occur months, years, or even decades after the event.
Contents
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Post-traumatic_stress_disorder

THIS IS BULLSHIT!
Information for Veterans and the General Public
The PTSD Information Center has Fact Sheets and Videos to answer your questions on trauma, PTSD and related issues. A good place to start is What is PTSD?
http://www.ncptsd.va.gov/ncmain/index.jsp

Although PTSD is often associated with Vietnam veterans, it appears in veterans of all wars and eras. There have been
GOOGEL MORE:

s Iraq Like Vietnam? PTSD and the Readjustment Blues - Willie Hager
GOOGLE VIDEO:
http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=6977956688767511548

Increase American troops in Iraq? At what cost? In a haunting monologue taped thirty years ago, Vietnam Vet Willie Hager talks about ... all Post-Vietnam Syndrome (now called PTSD) and the price paid by veterans and society for participating in a war that doesn't have a good enough reason. As a former leader of Vietnam Veteran's Against the War, Willie's life inspired the 1978 Jane Fonda-Jon Voight movie Coming Home and the 2005 audiobook Camouflage & Lace by Diane Ford Wood (audio clips on http://www.cdbaby.com/camo ). Then, as now, the relevance of Willie's words hang somewhere between the past and the future and even life and death. For some combat-experienced vets, it takes fifteen years for the war experience to hit home; which for Willie was less about what happened in Vietnam than how things went when he came home. This patriotic man not only dedicated over ten years to military service, he received a Presidential appointment to West Point because of losing two fathers to war. He turned down the opportunity in favor of joining the Marine Corps as a grunt. Don't miss reading and blogging about Willie has to say about America's political future -- and what we can do about it -- on http://www.vetspeak.com.
http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=6977956688767511548

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Suicide, PTSD, Mental Breakdowns and Unending Violence
Letters From Iraq
http://www.apfn.org/apfn/iraq_horror.htm

AUDIO: 7/16/06....Vets... PTSD...SHELL SHOCK....ETC...!!
http://www.apfn.net/pogo/A006I06071608F.MP3

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